In MAF we often talk about how each “link in the chain” is so important —and how even one missing link affects all the other parts. MAF’s life-transforming work overseas could not take place without supporting countries like New Zealand! MAF New Zealand is a vital "link in the chain". We raise the money, prayer and staff to keep the planes flying

But our work would be severely hampered without the MAF aircraft. It is another vital "link in the chain". Since the MAF aircraft arrived in New Zealand in March 2015, it has been the “centre piece” of all our efforts to support the work overseas. It has has enabled us to promote MAF at airshows, Christian events like Festival One and at MAF events from Invercargill to Kerikeri.

The aircraft has been vital to everything we have been able to achieve so far—and what we hope to achieve in the future!

Because it has been in New Zealand, many hundreds of people have had the chance to see the plane, meet the MAF NZ staff and catch the vision! It helps potential recruits experience the kind of aircraft we fly overseas. People have the chance to sit in the pilot’s seat talk to our experienced pilots and find out what it’s really like to fly for MAF.

The aircraft allows us to help in practical ways too. After the November 2016 earthquake in Kaikoura we flew plane-loads of presents, food and Christmas cheer to three large farms cut off by landslides in the upper Awatere Valley.

Can you see how the aircraft is an essential “link” that helps us keep the work of MAF going? But we can’t do it without you! In fact—you are another vital link in the chain!

Would you be willing to give towards keeping the MAF plane flying in New Zealand? Your gift will keep the plane flying in New Zealand!

 

MAKE A DONATION

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT ARTICLES

FEATURED ARTICLES

Thank you for finding out about buying one or more of MAF’s $35 “Jerrycans of Jet Fuel” this Christmas! Each jerrycan card helps us make a flight that could change a life. With over 135 aircraft,
Which Stories Could You Change the Ending Of? “She is not dead yet,” said one of the villagers, “but she will die soon.” Lihut, a 15-year-old girl, was pregnant and trying to deliver, but the baby